We are planting out the indoor square foot garden today, talking about the right type of soil, and having the right type lights. I will also share some tricks to spacing your crops to make…

30 COMMENTS

  1. enjoyed your video Luke I was wondering you were saying you used pro mix in your indoor garden I thought when starting seeds you were supposed to use a soilless growing medium with no fertilizer and then when Thay sprout and start growing and get there true leaves you start applying fertilizer at a quarter strength

  2. I want to grow dwarf fruit trees. I saw your comment about it being best to start them in small pots and work them up but how do you know when you can stop increasing pot size? Can I just stop moving it when it gets to the size I want and it will stay there?

  3. Good video with great tips. I start my fairly wide variety of seedlings in seed cells, indoors under grow lights. I transplant tomatoes and peppers to bigger pots when I see the first set of "true leaves". I find your approach intriguing but I have a couple of questions. First, I find that different types of veggies seedling grow at different heights – which I manage by raising or lowering the containers (to maintain an optimum proximity to the lights). How do you (or do you) deal with this?

    The second question is whether you in fact transplant tomatoes and peppers at all? Thanks in advance.

  4. Good video with great tips. I start my fairly wide variety of seedlings in seed cells, indoors under grow lights. I transplant tomatoes and peppers to bigger pots when I see the first set of "true leaves". I find your approach intriguing but I have a couple of questions. First, I find that different types of veggies seedling grow at different heights – which I manage by raising or lowering the containers (to maintain an optimum proximity to the lights). How do you (or do you) deal with this?

    The second question is whether you in fact transplant tomatoes and peppers at all? Thanks in advance.

  5. Thanks Luke this was very informative. I really like how you take the time and let us know what you use and how to get the job done right the first time !πŸ€—

  6. Have to correct you on a minor point with the fluorescent lights with regard to sizes, the lights you have on the ceiling are T12 size tubes, the T number is the diameter (aka thickness) of the tube in eighths of an Inch, the common sizes for most straight-tubes being T12, T8 and T5… πŸ™‚

  7. The light spectrum and intensity of that output are 2 key factors in choosing "grow" lighting.
    5000K – 6700K is the desired spectrum and 2200L-3000L is the desired intensity.
    K is Kelvin and L is Lummens. Most all of the bulbs state those two factors on the packaging.
    Most people are now starting to move away from CFL bulbs, as they contain Mercury. People are also looking for greater efficiency. So enters the LED. Most of your 4ft CFL use about 32 to 40 Watts per hour each, and most often your lights need to be on about 12 to 18 hours. The 4ft LED's are operating at about 18 to 20 Watts per hour each. Over time, this can equal a savings, depending on how many you have in your set up. I personally have 2 stations that have 6 bulbs each, and getting ready to set up a third, maybe a 4th, as I'm slowly building up my business.
    My rate is .13cents/Kwatt/hour. I operated them 15 hours each day.
    6 cfl's for me costs (2.88KW each day @15hrs x.13cents ) about .37 cents per day per station/1 year =$135.00
    6 LED for me costs (1.62KW each day @15hrs x.13cents ) about .21 cents per day per station/1 year – $76.00
    Over a 30 days : CFL =$11.10 – LED=$6.31 is the difference…$4.79/30 days per station
    You can see the savings is fairly significant over the course of a 1 year per station. This allows me to buy more lights, tables, seeds and other business related stuff!
    The real upside is I'm not using mercury filled bulbs. Even though CFL pretty much remain cool to the touch, the LED's put out even less heat. Also, I can run some of my light via a small solar panel set up…so I can reduce electricity costs.

  8. You may want to look into COBs when talking LEDs, there are parts you can buy and put together a 2 COB setup that would cover a pretty wide area if you use the COB bare, it would be around 100 bucks as long as you're good with wiring it yourself.

  9. I want to do better this year with starting from seed. I had to go to Lowe's for peppers after none of mine germinated. I'm thinking a heat mat should do the trick. I'd like to know your thoughts on a DIY heat mat – coiling a rope light around on a plywood base. The plant cell tray would sit on top of it. Would this work? Or do I need to just buy the grow mat? Thanks!

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